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Ali Lisha Gilmore 30, Pregnant/Missing Feb. 6, 2006 FL.

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Themis Eternal

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#41 [url]

Apr 22 06 2:36 PM

The Benefit for Ali was postponed. We will post it's new date once it is released. Thank you all.

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Themis Eternal

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#42 [url]

May 8 06 8:24 PM

Missing Gilmore Case on Montel Williams Show Results in Several Sightings

May 8,2006
Leonard Horton

Close to 40 sightings of missing pregnant woman Ali Gilmore were reported to Tallah"DorkFish"ee police over the weekend.

The case was featured on the Montel Williams show Friday morning.

Tallah"DorkFish"ee police OFC John Newland says the reported sightings are from all over the country, some as far as Missouri, New Mexico and California.

The department is checking all of the tips, hoping one will lead to a break in the case.

"The way we are going to do that is by sending a flyer to each police agency, letting them take a look at that and letting them interview the people who say they saw her, and see exactly if that is going to be Ali," says Newland.

If anyone has any information on the whereabouts of Ali Lisha Gilmore you can call the Tallah"DorkFish"ee police at 850-891-4200.

http://www.wctv6.com/home/headlines/2765466.html

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#44 [url]

Jun 27 06 8:17 AM

Ali Gilmore featured on Billboards

Missing Woman Featured on Billboards

Her smiling face looms 10 feet tall on a billboard at the corner of South Monroe and Paul Russell. Thirty years old and pregnant, Ali Gilmore has literally vanished.

Tracy Smith, Gilmore's sister, says, "I have a hole in my heart. I have a worm eating through my brain because I don't know what or where; who, what, where, why and when."

Oscar Walker, Gilmore's brother, adds, "It's awfully tough, we just try to keep the faith, we pray, but the prayers get harder and harder to express."

Crimestoppers and Summit Advertising have teamed up to put up the m"DorkFish"ive missing poster. It's less than a mile from Ali Gilmore's now eerily quiet southside home.

Walt McNeil, Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police Chief, says, "It's significant that it's on the southside near where she lived. Hopefully someone who lives in the area will see it and remember, yeah, I did see that lady."

Gilmore's co-workers from the Department of Health gathered beneath the billboard to pray for her protection and safe return and hope someone who sees her face will be moved to come forward.

Karen Freeman, Gilmore's supervisor who reported her missing, says, "My gut wants to tell me she ran away or someone has her against her will. I can't entertain the worst case scenario. I haven't been able to do that."

The billboard went up Wednesday morning and three more will be going up around town soon. FAMU students are also planning to post hundreds of yard signs with Gilmore's picture on them on Friday.

http://www.wctv6.com/news/headlines/2391061.html

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Themis Eternal

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#45 [url]

Aug 21 06 8:25 AM

Originally published August 21, 2006
Some want Amber Alerts expanded
Ali Gilmore supporters want system to include women, students


By Stephen D. Price
CAPITOL BUREAU

When Ali Gilmore went missing after Feb. 2, there was no emergency response or immediate coordinated effort to find her. Some say if Amber Alerts included women, the 30-year-old Tallah"DorkFish"ee resident's disappearance may have been solved by now.

But Amber Alerts are made only for children under 18 years old.

Bishop Thomas Masters, Gilmore's former pastor, hopes to change that law.

"We want it for college students and women in general," said Masters, pastor of New Macedonia Baptist Church in Riviera Beach and president of the Palm Beach County Coalition to Stop the Violence. "We feel they need to have that kind of protection."

State Rep. Priscilla Taylor, D-West Palm Beach, said she is researching the issue and may craft a bill to change the law.

"I think it can help," said Taylor, who wondered if Gilmore would've been found with an Amber Alert.

But she wants to make sure the Amber Alert system is not abused by adult runaways, not abductees, trying to flee from life's pressures.

The Amber Alert System began in 1996 when Dallas-Fort Worth broadcasters teamed with local police to develop an early-warning system to help find abducted children. It was created as a legacy to 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, who was kidnapped while riding her bicycle in Arlington, Texas, and then murdered.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement criteria for issuing an Amber Alert is:

The child must be younger than 18.

There must be a clear indication of an abduction.

The law-enforcement agency's investigation must conclude the child's life is in danger.

There must be a detailed description of the child and/or the abductor and/or his vehicle to broadcast to the public.

The activation must be recommended by the local law-enforcement agency of jurisdiction.

Dana Mazza, who owns the Web site SomeoneIsMissing.com based in Daytona, which includes mostly missing adults, said changing the criteria for Amber Alerts in Florida would be wonderful.

"It's direly important, and why no one is doing it, I have no idea," Mazza said.

Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police spokesman John Newland said changing the Amber Alert system to include college students runs the risk of listing more runaways.

"You're going to start misusing that Amber Alert," Newland said. "That will be a tough law to get changed."

In Ali Gilmore's case, Newland doesn't think an Amber Alert would have made much difference.

Gilmore was last seen Feb. 2, a Thursday, after leaving her part-time job at the Publix bakery. Family and friends didn't know she was missing until that Monday. Police didn't find any evidence of foul play in Gilmore's disappearance, and no one has been charged.

"Under the circumstances, we don't know a crime has been committed," Newland said.

Masters disagrees.

"If we had something like that in place when Ali went missing, there would have been an emergency response."

For more information on the Florida Amber Alert system, go to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Web site at www.fdle.state.fl.us.

To sign the petition to change the Amber Alert law, go to google.com and search "Amber Alert for women."

Contact Democrat senior writer Stephen D. Price at
(850) 671-6548 or [email protected]"DorkFish"ee.com

http://www.tallah"DorkFish"ee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060821/NEWS01/608210320

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#46 [url]

Feb 6 07 1:12 AM

Originally published February 5, 2007

Ali Gilmore:
one year later
Friends, family mark anniversary of search for missing woman


By Stephen D. Price

A year ago a four-month pregnant Ali Gilmore received a late-night phone call, left her house and disappeared into a stormy night.

After 12 months of investigating, searches and national publicity, Gilmore's whereabouts remain a mystery, and clues to her disappearance are fading along with hope she will be found.

The toll shows on Gilmore's family, after a year of not knowing if she is alive or dead.

''Some mornings I'm just overburdened by it,'' said Gilmore's mother, Laurvetta Grimsley-McLawrence. ''It has been a difficult year.''

After beginning the investigation with four ''people of interest,'' investigators now say they have narrowed their focus.

''Common sense would tell you something is not right,'' said Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police Investigator Tom Maltese. ''But until something happens, we can't say something definitive.''

Eleven bound files sit on a shelf in the office of Investigators Maltese and J.D. Hoover, filled with interviews, evidence and leads on the Florida A&M graduate. They hold a lot of information, but not an answer to Gilmore's disappearance.

The two detectives are still investigating the case but are no longer working exclusively on it.

''Given the case is a year old, you don't have the leads you had two days after the case broke,'' said Sgt. J.B. Johnson. ''So what do you do with your time?''

Gilmore disappeared sometime after 11 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006, during a thunderstorm.

Earlier in the day she'd been at her day job at the Department of Health, and that evening she went to her second job at the bakery at Publix at its former Apalachee Parkway location. Later that evening, she went to the house that she shared with her estranged husband, James, at 231 Loraine Court.

She got a call late that night, police now confirm, but they won't say who it was from.

''It's certainly important to us, but it doesn't open any doors,'' Hoover said. ''It's not the defining moment as to what happened to Ali.''

The investigation was hampered by the four-day delay before authorities were called to the case. Ali didn't report to work that Friday and wasn't reported missing until Monday when co-workers went to her house and called police.

Gilmore's car was left in the driveway, a set of work keys were still in her purse in the car, but her house keys were gone. The house was locked except for a side window in a spare bedroom. No evidence of foul play was found.

Because the case is ongoing, investigators wouldn't specify how the investigation has narrowed, but did say they are sharing information with the state attorney and recently received lab results from evidence that they hope will lead to answers.

Meanwhile, Gilmore's husband, James, says he's trying to piece his life together since his wife disappeared, though he's struggling emotionally and financially.

The house the couple shared on Loraine Court (they were separated at the time of her disappearance), is in foreclosure proceedings. Documents in the case say it's impossible to determine if Ali Gilmore is living or dead.

James Gilmore, who has since moved back into the house, is unemployed, but will soon graduate with a bachelor's degree in business administration from Flagler College, he said. It's an accomplishment his wife encouraged him to pursue.

He said he is baffled by her disappearance.

''The not knowing is the hardest part,'' he said, adding that he doubts his wife is alive. ''No foreseeable closure.''

James Gilmore said he is also confused by the cloud of suspicion he's under by those who think he had something to do with his wife's absence.

''I had no idea so many people suspected me,'' he said, of reading comments on the Internet of people who point to him. ''I wouldn't hurt anyone, much less my wife.''

The couple had a counseling session scheduled the Friday morning that Ali Gilmore disappeared. Neither made the appointment and James Gilmore said he overslept.

Police have said James Gilmore has been cooperative.

Family members say they have run through emotions since Gilmore has been missing, from anger, hurt and betrayal to helplessness. This weekend they were set to hold a prayer vigil in Gilmore's honor and intended to p"DorkFish" out fliers with her picture on them.

Attalah McLawrence last spoke to her sister Jan. 29, 2006, when Gilmore encouraged her to get her master's degree. McLawrence took her advice and will graduate this spring with a master's degree.

''Ali always motivated me,'' McLawrence said.

But her sister said she is concerned that community support to find her has waned.

''I don't know if they think we've found Ali, but we haven't,'' McLawrence said.

Recent reports of a 15-year-old Missouri boy missing since 2002, being found safe gave some family members hope that Gilmore, too, will be found alive.

''It let me know, don't give up,'' Attalah McLawrence said. ''I was like, this could be our story.''

If Ali Gilmore were found alive today, she would be 31 and, if her pregnancy went to full term, her baby would be about 7 months old.

Investigators haven't ruled out that Gilmore could be alive.

''We still have a missing-persons case, not a homicide,'' said Tallah"DorkFish"ee Investigator J.D. Hoover.

Tracy Smith, Gilmore's sister, hasn't given up hope.

''Just missing alone gives you a shadow of hope.''

http://www.tallah"DorkFish"ee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070205/NEWS01/702050326

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Gaia

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#47 [url]

May 15 07 11:54 AM

What happened to Ali Gilmore?
Ali was ambitious, hard-working and reliable. So when she disappeared, her family was certain she hadn't just run off

image

By Sara James
Correspondent
NBC News
Updated: 9:33 p.m. ET May 8, 2007
This report airs Tuesday, May 8 on Dateline NBC.





Tallah"DorkFish"ee, Fla. - Ali Gilmore was many things. She was charming, warm and above all, a planner.

Attallah, Ali's sister: She stuck by those plans. She didn’t play when it came to her plans.

Born to working cl"DorkFish" parents, Ali set her sights on college. She landed a good job at Florida’s Department of Health and with the help of a second job at a supermarket, soon achieved a third goal—buying a house.

Ali fell in love, got married, and in November 2005, became pregnant—another dream. What’s more, she accomplished all this by the age of 30, just as she’d promised herself.

What was not in Ali’s plans, was to disappear.

Lawrvetta McLawrence, Ali's mother: [To her, I would say] I love you so much. I just pray and ask God to bring you to us darling. I just pray, all I want is my Ali.

This is the story of an ever-spiraling riddle, and the big-league efforts of a determined family to make the invisible visible—to find their beloved Ali and bring her home.

On Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006, Ali Gilmore left her night job at a supermarket in Tallah"DorkFish"ee and drove home. When she failed to show up for her day job on Friday, then again on Monday, her friend and co-worker, Karen Freeman, knew that something had to be wrong.

Sara James, Dateline correspondent: And had she ever not shown up for work?

Karen Freeman, co-worker: No.

Karen drove to her friend’s home, where she found Ali’s car, but not Ali. Karen called the police, who found nothing amiss—no sign of a struggle. Ali’s supermarket clothes lay on the bed, indicating she’d made it home from work. But that was as far as authorities could track her.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: Unbelievable. I didn’t believe it.

400 hundred miles south in Riviera Beach, Fla., Ali’s parents Carl and Lawrvetta McLawrence and sisters Tracey and Attallah were asleep when they got the news.

Tracey, sister: I’m like, "Missing? What do you mean, missing?" How does an adult become missing?

At first police thought that Ali, like so many missing persons, might have run off. In fact, the last few months had been tough for Ali: Just days before learning she was pregnant, she and her husband of five years had split up. And adding to the stress, the woman known for her careful planning feared she was heading toward a financial crisis.

Freeman: I knew she had been having financial struggles.

Karen says that Ali called her from her supermarket job on the night she went missing — anxious over an unexpected increase in her property taxes.

Freeman: She was upset about it and didn’t know what she was going to do.

That desperate phone call makes Karen wonder if her friend might have done something completely out of character.

Karen: I’m hoping ‘cause of that stress, she just decided she couldn’t take it and just left.

But that’s a scenario Ali’s family says is simply out of the question.

Sara James: Do you think that there is any chance that your daughter just got fed up with things, and left?

Carl McLawrence, father: No way. No way in the world.

Sara James: And where does that confidence come from?

Carl McLawrence: It comes from knowing her.

So far, there is little evidence that Ali ran off. No one spotted her anywhere, and police say their constant monitoring of her bank and credit card accounts showed no activity since she disappeared.

With Ali’s trail stone cold, investigators inevitably centered on the darkest of possibilities: that she’d been kidnapped or killed. Ali’s mother says her daughter wouldn’t have gone quietly.

Lawrvetta McLawrence, mother: If anybody did harm to her, you better believe they had some kind of mark left on them.

Police combed for blood, hair, DNA, went door to door, and used a helicopter and bloodhounds to scour local streets and the surrounding woods.

“Canines picks up certain scents,” says the police department’s public information officer John Newland.

Sara James: And you didn’t find anything in the canine search?

John Newland, police department public information: No.

Sara James: And you didn’t find anything in the door-to-door search? Nobody had seen anything?

Newland: No.

What had happened to Ali?

As fear turned to frustration, Ali’s family canv"DorkFish"ed the region— handing out “Ali Gilmore” flyers, T-shirts, pens, buttons and business cards. There were billboards, even a Web site providing updates and that counts the time Ali has been missing—down to the second.

Ali’s cousin Michael Brown, mayor of Riviera Beach, says if this sounds like a full-fledged campaign, it is fueled by Ali’s mother’s experience managing his election bid.

Sara James: Right down to the yard signs, this is politics at the gr"DorkFish"roots level. But in this case, the politics is Ali - finding Ali.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: That’s right.

Police are talking to several “people of interest” including Ali’s estranged husband, James Gilmore. Shortly after her disappearance, he moved back into the house they’d once shared.

James Gilmore, estranged husband: I want everybody to know and understand how much I love and miss Ali.

James acknowledges that his relationship with Ali had been rocky in the months before she disappeared and that the couple often fought about money—especially when the part-time college student, who worked as a supermarket stoc"Filtered by Word Censor"n, failed to get a better paying job he’d applied for.

Sara James: She was putting pressure on you?

James Gilmore, estranged husband: Yeah, putting pressure on me to whatever, to…

Sara James: Step it up?

James Gilmore: Yeah, exactly.

But James says that despite their troubles, he and Ali were trying to work things out—especially now that they had a baby on the way.

James Gilmore: I was happy. I mean, I was ready to see what it was going to be and what we were going to name it.

In fact, the couple had just begun marriage counseling. Their second appointment was scheduled for February 3 — the very morning Ali disappeared. Not only did she miss the appointment, so did James.

James Gilmore: I was just up late that previous night and I just overslept.

James maintains he was at his brother’s home the night Ali vanished, but concedes the timing of the missed appointment has raised questions.

Sara James: Do you know where Ali is?

James Gilmore: I have no idea where Ali is?

Sara James: Would you ever hurt her?

James Gilmore: I’d never hurt my wife.

Sara James: Did you kill Ali?

James Gilmore: I - I can’t even believe you’re even asking me that question. Wow. No, I didn’t kill Ali, but I can’t even believe you’re asking me a question like that.

Sara James: Why?

James Gilmore: That’s my wife, man. I mean…

Sara James: People have killed their wives before.

James Gilmore: Anybody who knows me—anybody who’s known me for all of a couple of weeks would know that I am not the kind of person that would render harm to any living soul whatsoever.

As for police...

Officer Newland: We’ve checked into everything that he has told us.

Officer Newland says James has been totally cooperative, answering questions, even agreeing to a voice-stress test similar to a polygraph. They say a preliminary analysis shows he’s telling the truth.

Newland: He voluntarily did that, and there was no deception on his part in that. Of course that, along with some other files did get sent off.

Sara James: To the FBI?

Newland: To the FBI to let them look into the case.

With no clear-cut evidence to lead to anyone’s arrest, younger sister Attallah says sometimes she tries to turn back time—by calling Ali’s office to hear her sister’s voice.

Attallah: And you’ll just hear this chipper voice. “Hi. You’ve reached Ali Gilmore.”

In July 2006, around Ali’s due date, police planted a tree and later neighbors planted flowers - in honor of Ali and her baby.

Attallah: She was so excited about her baby. That’s all she talked about.

It’s been more than a year since Ali’s disappearance. While no one wants to give up, Ali’s mother confesses how hard it’s become to hold on to hope.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: I feel like my daughter’s gone. That’s my feeling. And if I’m wrong, God forgive me. It’s been too long, too long. That’s my feeling.

If you have any information, contact Big Bend Crime Stoppers at 850-891-HELP or go to
http://www.whereisaligilmore.com/ . You can also discuss the case on our message boards
.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18561766/

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Gaia

Senior Elite Member

Posts: 24,085 Co Founder

#48 [url]

Jun 18 08 1:28 PM

Two-Year Anniversary of the Disappearance of Ali Gilmore


Posted: 3:17 AM Feb 4, 2008
Last Updated: 9:49 PM Feb 4, 2008
Email Address: [email protected]

18 comments


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A | A | A Two years ago (2/3/06), Tallah"DorkFish"ee woman Ali Gilmore went missing. She was 30 years old and four months pregnant at the time.

Gilmore worked for the Florida Department of Health and for the Publix formerly on Apalachee Parkway.


She was last seen leaving work at that Publix at about 11 o'clock the night before she went missing.

Over the next year, family, friends and police looked for Gilmore using billboards, flyers and community-wide searches.

A candle light vigil was held on the one year anniversary of her disappearance.

At that vigil Tracy Smith, Gilmore's sister said "I am very happy and pleased at the community came out to support and it really reinforces the love that everyone has for Ali."

Gilmore was separated from her husband James Gilmore at the time of her disappearance and police said he was a person of interest.

However, last March, a Leon County judge ruled that he was the sole beneficiary of his missing wife's estate.

This past summer, FDLE featured Gilmore's picture on cold-case playing cards, but the case remains unsolved.


http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/15271091.html

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Gaia

Senior Elite Member

Posts: 24,085 Co Founder

#49 [url]

Jun 18 08 1:32 PM

What happened to Ali Gilmore?
Ali was ambitious, hard-working and reliable. So when she disappeared, her family was certain she hadn't just run off




By Sara James
Correspondent
NBC News
updated 9:33 p.m. ET, Tues., May. 8, 2007
This report airs Tuesday, May 8 on Dateline NBC.



Sara James
Correspondent

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tallah"DorkFish"ee, Fla. - Ali Gilmore was many things. She was charming, warm and above all, a planner.

Attallah, Ali's sister: She stuck by those plans. She didn’t play when it came to her plans.

Born to working cl"DorkFish" parents, Ali set her sights on college. She landed a good job at Florida’s Department of Health and with the help of a second job at a supermarket, soon achieved a third goal—buying a house.

Ali fell in love, got married, and in November 2005, became pregnant—another dream. What’s more, she accomplished all this by the age of 30, just as she’d promised herself.

What was not in Ali’s plans, was to disappear.

Lawrvetta McLawrence, Ali's mother: [To her, I would say] I love you so much. I just pray and ask God to bring you to us darling. I just pray, all I want is my Ali.

This is the story of an ever-spiraling riddle, and the big-league efforts of a determined family to make the invisible visible—to find their beloved Ali and bring her home.

On Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006, Ali Gilmore left her night job at a supermarket in Tallah"DorkFish"ee and drove home. When she failed to show up for her day job on Friday, then again on Monday, her friend and co-worker, Karen Freeman, knew that something had to be wrong.

Sara James, Dateline correspondent: And had she ever not shown up for work?

Karen Freeman, co-worker: No.

Karen drove to her friend’s home, where she found Ali’s car, but not Ali. Karen called the police, who found nothing amiss—no sign of a struggle. Ali’s supermarket clothes lay on the bed, indicating she’d made it home from work. But that was as far as authorities could track her.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: Unbelievable. I didn’t believe it.

400 hundred miles south in Riviera Beach, Fla., Ali’s parents Carl and Lawrvetta McLawrence and sisters Tracey and Attallah were asleep when they got the news.

Tracey, sister: I’m like, "Missing? What do you mean, missing?" How does an adult become missing?

At first police thought that Ali, like so many missing persons, might have run off. In fact, the last few months had been tough for Ali: Just days before learning she was pregnant, she and her husband of five years had split up. And adding to the stress, the woman known for her careful planning feared she was heading toward a financial crisis.

Freeman: I knew she had been having financial struggles.

Karen says that Ali called her from her supermarket job on the night she went missing — anxious over an unexpected increase in her property taxes.

Freeman: She was upset about it and didn’t know what she was going to do.

That desperate phone call makes Karen wonder if her friend might have done something completely out of character.

Karen: I’m hoping ‘cause of that stress, she just decided she couldn’t take it and just left.

But that’s a scenario Ali’s family says is simply out of the question.

Sara James: Do you think that there is any chance that your daughter just got fed up with things, and left?

Carl McLawrence, father: No way. No way in the world.

Sara James: And where does that confidence come from?

Carl McLawrence: It comes from knowing her.

So far, there is little evidence that Ali ran off. No one spotted her anywhere, and police say their constant monitoring of her bank and credit card accounts showed no activity since she disappeared.

With Ali’s trail stone cold, investigators inevitably centered on the darkest of possibilities: that she’d been kidnapped or killed. Ali’s mother says her daughter wouldn’t have gone quietly.

Lawrvetta McLawrence, mother: If anybody did harm to her, you better believe they had some kind of mark left on them.

Police combed for blood, hair, DNA, went door to door, and used a helicopter and bloodhounds to scour local streets and the surrounding woods.

“Canines picks up certain scents,” says the police department’s public information officer John Newland.

Sara James: And you didn’t find anything in the canine search?

John Newland, police department public information: No.

Sara James: And you didn’t find anything in the door-to-door search? Nobody had seen anything?

Newland: No.

What had happened to Ali?

As fear turned to frustration, Ali’s family canv"DorkFish"ed the region— handing out “Ali Gilmore” flyers, T-shirts, pens, buttons and business cards. There were billboards, even a Web site providing updates and that counts the time Ali has been missing—down to the second.

Ali’s cousin Michael Brown, mayor of Riviera Beach, says if this sounds like a full-fledged campaign, it is fueled by Ali’s mother’s experience managing his election bid.

Sara James: Right down to the yard signs, this is politics at the gr"DorkFish"roots level. But in this case, the politics is Ali - finding Ali.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: That’s right.

Police are talking to several “people of interest” including Ali’s estranged husband, James Gilmore. Shortly after her disappearance, he moved back into the house they’d once shared.

James Gilmore, estranged husband: I want everybody to know and understand how much I love and miss Ali.

James acknowledges that his relationship with Ali had been rocky in the months before she disappeared and that the couple often fought about money—especially when the part-time college student, who worked as a supermarket stoc"Filtered by Word Censor"n, failed to get a better paying job he’d applied for.

Sara James: She was putting pressure on you?

James Gilmore, estranged husband: Yeah, putting pressure on me to whatever, to…

Sara James: Step it up?

James Gilmore: Yeah, exactly.

But James says that despite their troubles, he and Ali were trying to work things out—especially now that they had a baby on the way.

James Gilmore: I was happy. I mean, I was ready to see what it was going to be and what we were going to name it.

In fact, the couple had just begun marriage counseling. Their second appointment was scheduled for February 3 — the very morning Ali disappeared. Not only did she miss the appointment, so did James.

James Gilmore: I was just up late that previous night and I just overslept.

James maintains he was at his brother’s home the night Ali vanished, but concedes the timing of the missed appointment has raised questions.

Sara James: Do you know where Ali is?

James Gilmore: I have no idea where Ali is?

Sara James: Would you ever hurt her?

James Gilmore: I’d never hurt my wife.

Sara James: Did you kill Ali?

James Gilmore: I - I can’t even believe you’re even asking me that question. Wow. No, I didn’t kill Ali, but I can’t even believe you’re asking me a question like that.

Sara James: Why?

James Gilmore: That’s my wife, man. I mean…

Sara James: People have killed their wives before.

James Gilmore: Anybody who knows me—anybody who’s known me for all of a couple of weeks would know that I am not the kind of person that would render harm to any living soul whatsoever.

As for police...

Officer Newland: We’ve checked into everything that he has told us.

Officer Newland says James has been totally cooperative, answering questions, even agreeing to a voice-stress test similar to a polygraph. They say a preliminary analysis shows he’s telling the truth.

Newland: He voluntarily did that, and there was no deception on his part in that. Of course that, along with some other files did get sent off.

Sara James: To the FBI?

Newland: To the FBI to let them look into the case.

With no clear-cut evidence to lead to anyone’s arrest, younger sister Attallah says sometimes she tries to turn back time—by calling Ali’s office to hear her sister’s voice.

Attallah: And you’ll just hear this chipper voice. “Hi. You’ve reached Ali Gilmore.”

In July 2006, around Ali’s due date, police planted a tree and later neighbors planted flowers - in honor of Ali and her baby.

Attallah: She was so excited about her baby. That’s all she talked about.

It’s been more than a year since Ali’s disappearance. While no one wants to give up, Ali’s mother confesses how hard it’s become to hold on to hope.

Lawrvetta McLawrence: I feel like my daughter’s gone. That’s my feeling. And if I’m wrong, God forgive me. It’s been too long, too long. That’s my feeling.

If you have any information, contact Big Bend Crime Stoppers at 850-891-HELP or go to
http://www.whereisaligilmore.com/ . You can also discuss the case on our message boards
.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18561766/

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Themis Eternal

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Posts: 17,437 Founder

#50 [url]

Feb 3 09 6:49 PM

No sign of Ali Gilmore three years later; case called 'technically' cold
By Nic Corbett • DEMOCRAT STAFF WRITER • February 3, 2009

Three years of not knowing what happened to Ali Gilmore has devastated her family.

"It really took a toll on (my mother)," said Gilmore's sister, Tracy Smith, 39. "It aged her. She was so mobile before, and now she's not as mobile. ... You never experience something like that, the not knowing where she is, not knowing what happened.

"Some days, you say, 'Well, I know she's dead,' and other days you say, 'Well, they don't have a body, so you know.' It's the hope."

Gilmore disappeared without a trace in the early-morning hours of Friday, Feb. 3, 2006. She was 30 years old and four months pregnant. Since then, there have been searches and candlelight vigils, but no closure for her family.

"It is technically a cold case, but it is still ongoing and active and still being investigated any time we have new information," said Officer David McCranie, spokesman for the Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police Department. "Additionally, the case file is reviewed periodically by another set of eyes, another investigator, to see if there's anything that we may have missed."

McCranie wouldn't elaborate on any new leads.

"We continue to follow up on information that we receive, no matter how trivial it may seem to the lay person," he said. "We hold out hope for her family, that she's still alive, but until we find her, we won't be able to answer that."

Gilmore was last seen about 11 p.m. Feb. 2, 2006, leaving her part-time job at Publix on Apalachee Parkway. Tallah"DorkFish"ee police say she received a phone call at 12:47 a.m. but have not released who called.

Her car was left in the driveway of her Loraine Court home in southwest Tallah"DorkFish"ee. Her purse was found inside with a set of work keys but not her house or car keys. Police say they found no evidence of foul play. There was no sign of forced entry into the house, which was locked except for one window.

Gilmore's estranged husband, James Gilmore, had said he called her that Friday morning, the day she disappeared, but no one answered. He then went to the house the next day, but no one was there. Co-workers reported her missing Monday.

Six months after her disappearance, police said they logged 1,600 hours searching for her. They said they had several persons of interest, but never made an arrest. Police have said her husband was cooperative and offered to take a lie-detector test. He could not be reached for comment.

Gilmore's family has been frustrated with the lack of information coming from investigators. Gilmore's mother, Laurvetta Grimsley-McLawrence, said they are considering hiring a lawyer.

"We want to know what's going on since they tell us nothing," she said. "Have they actually done the things that they have told us they were doing? We want to know what's going on. We never had trust in these people, at least I never had trust in them. I feel like everything they told me was a lie. They shifted around from one person to another, and there was one time where they were avoiding my calls."

The fact that items found in Gilmore's car are now at her mother's house and not in some police vault disturbs Smith, she said.

"I watch TV. Maybe I watch too much TV. Maybe I'm presuming too much, but I feel in my heart that everything that was in her car they should have in evidence," Smith said.

Police victim advocate Kim Powell said police documented all of the evidence and only kept the items they needed. The items they returned to the family were going to be destroyed by a repo company that seized her car.

"It was kind of a good-faith gesture that we did on our part," Powell said.

In honor of Gilmore, the family is planning a private candlelight vigil in Riviera Beach, where they live. They will recite some scriptures from the Bible, Smith said.

Anyone with information can call police at (850) 891-4200 or Crime Stoppers at (850) 574-TIPS (8477).


Contact reporter Nic Corbett at (850) 599-2161 or [email protected]"DorkFish"ee.com.



http://tallah"DorkFish"ee.com/article/20090203/NEWS01/902030321/1010

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Themis Eternal

Senior Elite Member

Posts: 17,437 Founder

#51 [url]

Feb 4 09 3:08 AM

Ali Gilmore Missing 3 Years

Posted: 11:57 PM Feb 3, 2009
Last Updated: 11:57 PM Feb 3, 2009
Reporter: Liza Park
Email Address: [email protected]

Tuesday marks three years since a pregnant Tallah"DorkFish"ee woman disappeared without a trace.

30-year-old Ali Gilmore was last seen leaving her part-time job at the old Publix on Apalachee Parkway around 11 o'clock the night before she disappeared.

She didn't report to work at the Florida Department of Health the next morning... and hasn't been seen or heard from since.

Family, friends and police looked for Gilmore for about a year using billboards, flyers and volunteer searches.

We'll have more on the disappearance of Ali Gilmore on Friday.



http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/38985069.html

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Gaia

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Posts: 24,085 Co Founder

#52 [url]

Feb 7 09 5:22 PM

Search for Gilmore Continues


Posted: 7:53 PM Feb 6, 2009
Last Updated: 7:53 PM Feb 6, 2009
Reporter: Julie Montanaro
Email Address: [email protected]




[email protected]---------------

A | A | A Ali Gilmore was reported missing three years ago today (February 6,2006) and her friends and family are as baffled today as they were then.

Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police say the case is cold, but it will never be closed, until they find out why Gilmore vanished without a trace.


Karen Freeman picked up the phone that day in February 2006 and called police. Her co-worker and friend at the Department of Health, Ali Gilmore, hadn't shown up for work. She never imagined three years later, Gilmore would still be missing.

"I would like to know if she's alive or not alive. I may never get an answer. I hope I will, but you know, I may never get an answer. I've reached my own point of being ... of realizing, the answer may never come," said Freeman.

In the days, weeks and months following Gilmore's disappearance, flyers went up all over town, a billboard flashed her smiling face ten feet tall, friends and strangers searched woods and holding ponds near her home ... and nothing. No sign of her. No contact. No activity on her cell phone or bank account.

Tallah"DorkFish"ee Police say the case is cold, but they're still hoping to find that one critical clue they need to break the case.

"There's someone out there that had apiece of information that maybe they were afraid to provide it, things have changed in their life and maybe they make that phone call. They finally have enough nerve and courage to make that phone call and give us that one little piece of the puzzle that makes everything come together," said TPD Spokesman David McCranie.

Ali Gilmore's mother, Laurvetta Grimsley McLawrence, says she just takes one day at a time. She's frustrated that police have no answers, and says while everyone encourages her to remain hopeful she fears Ali is gone. She prays she's wrong.

TPD Victim Advocate Kimberly Powell has been working with Gilmore's family since the day she disappeared. She understands their frustration and looks forward to the day when she can call them family with some answers, some closure.

"There is no official date when the grieving process can begin or the time to heal it's as if their life is on hold, just waiting," Powell said.


http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/39236637.html

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Themis Eternal

A Growing Whisper

Posts: 2

#53 [url]

Aug 27 13 7:35 PM

We have done another post about Ali on our blog hoping for new information. Please check it out http://fromwhisperstoroars.blogspot.com/2013/08/ali-gilmore-has-been-missing-for-7.html

"To Live,That is the Greatest Adventure of All."

www.fromwhisperstoroars.org

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